How to Feel More Confident at Work

Do you ever feel insecure at work? Like you aren’t really contributing to your organization? I’ve been there too! In fact, I think it’s easy to fall into a rut and forget how great we are at our job. This self doubt can not only impact us emotionally, but it can affect how we function at work. So let’s get you back to your confident self with the tips below!

Track your wins

Keep a brag list. Write down every single thing you’ve done well at work. Keep track of all of the projects you’ve been on, and any direct impact you’ve had on your organization. Save emails from colleagues that praise and thank you. This is a great way to remind yourself that you’re actually better off than you thought! It will boost your confidence in your abilities, which will in turn make you more excited to achieve new wins. And as I mentioned last week, this list will also be helpful when you ask for a raise or promotion.

Use your voice

A piece of feedback I’ve consistently gotten at work is that I don’t speak up enough. (This may be shocking to some of you, because I really like to talk.) It’s really easy to sit back quietly in meetings, especially if you’re on the lower end of the hierarchy spectrum. But one of the easiest ways to feel like you’re contributing at work is to actually contribute to conversations. If you have an opinion about something, say it! Not only will you feel better about yourself, but your colleagues will likely notice you (in a good way). You’ll be showing that you care about the work, and that you have ideas and solutions. This can also help get you on new projects, give you more leadership opportunities, and even eventually be a basis for a promotion.

Take initiative

Oftentimes, it’s not enough to just do your daily tasks and go home. In order to really shine, and to feel great about yourself, sometimes you need to take the bulls by the horns. Rather than waiting for work to be assigned to you, go looking for it! If you’re feeling a little bored or unchallenged, ask your boss or other colleagues if there is anything you can help with. Or, if there’s something that you think is wrong or missing from your organization, ask if you can start your own project to address it. It doesn’t even necessarily have to be related to your day-to-day role.

For example, a couple years ago, I realized that my organization had stopped hosting occasional blood drives. I think people are much more likely to donate blood if it’s convenient to them, so I asked our operations department if I could help get the donations set up again. This unfortunately never materialized, but I felt good even trying. (And maybe I’ll give it another shot!) So go for it! Put yourself out there and see what you can achieve.

What do you want to take initiative on at work? Share in the comments!

Mentor others

Ever since I started my financial coaching business, I’ve noticed that I have more confidence in myself. Of course, I do still question myself and get caught up in self doubt sometimes. However, in coaching other women about their finances and helping them get to a better place, I’ve really honed in on my skills and unique knowledge. So not only am I helping others, but I’m helping myself by recognizing my own skills!

You can do this at work (or elsewhere) too! If you notice someone who is new to the organization, or who often seems nervous at work, take them under your wing. Ask them out for coffee and see if there is any way you can help or support them. You’ll not only be helping them move forward in their career, but you’ll feel good doing it. And maybe you’ll even find out that you have skills you didn’t know about.

If you’re looking for a mentor for yourself, but don’t know where to start, check out The Mentor Method!

 

This post was originally published on MaggieGermano.com and shared with permission.

Maggie is a Certified Financial Education Instructor and financial coach for women. Her life’s mission is to give women the support and the tools that they need to take control of their money, break the taboo of discussing debt and income, and achieve their goals and dreams. She does this through one-on-one financial coaching, monthly Money Circle gatherings, and speaking engagements. Passionate about many issues affecting women, Maggie also serves on the board of Collective Action for Safe Spaces, is a member of Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington’s Developing Leaders Program, and was trained as a salary negotiation facilitator by AAUW.